Fabric Glossary

Acrylic
A manufactured fiber, its major properties include a soft, wool-like hand, machine washable and dryable and excellent color retention

Broadcloth
A plain weave tightly woven fabric that is usually made from 100% cotton or a cotton blend. Most common uses are quilting and shirt-making.

Calico
A tightly-woven cotton type fabric with an all-over print, usually a small floral pattern on a contrasting background color. Common end-uses include dresses, aprons, and quilts.

Chambray
A plain woven fabric that can be made from cotton, silk, or manufactured fibers, but is most commonly cotton. It incorporates a colored warp (often blue) and white filling yarns

Charmuese
A luxurious, supple silky fabric with a shiny satin face and a dull back. Generally either silk, rayon ,or polyester. 

Corduroy
A fabric, usually made of cotton or a cotton blend, utilizing a cut-pile weave construction. The ''wale'' indicates the number of cords in one inch. Suitable for jackets, pants and skirts.

Cotton
A white vegetable fibre grown in warmer climates in many parts of the world, has been used to produce many types of fabric for hundreds of years. Cotton fabric feels good against the skin regardless of the temperature or the humidity and is therefore in great demand by the consumer.

Damask
A glossy jacquard-type fabric, the patterns are flat and reversible. Unlike jacquards, the fabric is all one color. Suitable for draperies, curtains bed and table linens. The name also refers to a typically Damask pattern which is printed onto a base cloth of Duck or Twill.

Duck
A tightly woven, heavy, plain-weave, bottom-weight fabric with a hard, durable finish. The fabric is usually made of cotton

Embroidery
An embellishment of a fabric or garment in which colored threads are sewn on to the fabric to create a design. Embroidery may be done either by hand or machine

Faux Fur
Artificial fur made from synthetic material.

Flannel
Usually a 100% cotton fabric that has been brushed on one or both sides for softness. Ideal for winter sheeting and baby blankets.

Fleece
Synthetic knit fabric that stretches across the grain

Gingham
A medium weight, plain weave fabric with a plaid or check pattern. End-uses include dresses, shirts, and curtains.

Gossamer
Very soft, gauze-like veiling originally of silk

Herringbone
A variation on the twill weave construction in which the twill is reversed, or broken, at regular intervals, producing a zig-zag effect.

Homespun
Refers to a coarse, plain weave fabric with a hand-woven look

Ikat
A fabric, usually handwoven which has been tie-dyed in the yarns prior to weaving. The pattern can range from simple little dots to intricate double ikats.

Jacquard
Woven fabrics manufactured by using the Jacquard attachment on the loom. This attachment provides versatility in designs and permits individual control of each of the warp yarns. Thus, fabrics of almost any type or complexity can be made. Brocade and damask are types of jacquard woven fabrics.

Jersey Fabric
Usually thinner or lighter-weight than Interlock knit with less stretch. It’s appropriate for tops and fuller dresses

Knit Fabrics
Fabrics made from only one set of yarns, all running in the same direction. Some knits have their yarns running along the length of the fabric, while others have their yarns running across the width of the fabric. Knit fabrics are held together by looping the yarns around each other. Knitting creates ridges in the resulting fabric. Wales are the ridges that run lengthwise in the fabric; courses run crosswise

Linen
A natural plant fiber, linen fibers are stronger and more lustrous than cotton. Depending on the weight, it’s appropriate for anything from heirloom sewing and blouses to slacks and jackets.

Lawn
A light, fine cloth made using carded or combed, linen or cotton yarns. The fabric has a crease-resistant, crisp finish. Linen lawn is synonymous with handkerchief linen. Cotton lawn is a similar type of fabric, which can be white, solid colored, or printed.

Matelassé
A medium to heavyweight luxury fabric made in a double cloth construction to create a blistered or quilted surface. Common end-uses are upholstery, draperies, and evening dresses.

Minky
A plush, microfiber fabric. It is incredibly soft and smooth to the touch. Minky fabric is used to construct blankets, typically for small children down to infant age. The texture provides comfort and a smooth surface to cuddle against or lie on.

Muslin
An inexpensive, medium weight, plain weave, low count (less than 160 threads per square inch) cotton sheeting fabric. In its unfinished form, it is commonly used in fashion design to make trial garments for preliminary fit.

Nylon
Produced in 1938, the first completely synthetic fiber developed. Known for its high strength and excellent resilience, nylon has superior abrasion resistance and high flexibility.

Organza
A crisp, sheer, lightweight plain weave fabric, with a medium to high yarn count, made of silk, rayon, nylon, or polyester

Oxford
A fine, soft, lightweight woven cotton or blended with manufactured fibers in a 2 x 1 basket weave variation of the plain weave construction. The fabric is used primarily in shirtings.

Percale
A close-textured woven cotton fabric, plain or printed, used esp for sheets, usually consisting of 180 or more threads per square inch.

Polyester
A manufactured fiber introduced in the early 1950s, and is second only to cotton in worldwide use. Polyester has high strength (although somewhat lower than nylon), excellent resiliency, and high abrasion resistance. Low absorbency allows the fiber to dry quickly

Quilting
A fabric construction in which a layer of down or fiberfill is placed between two layers of fabric, and then held in place by stitching or sealing in a regular, consistent, all-over pattern on the goods

Rayon
A natural fiber created from wood pulp, it usually has good drape and a soft hand

Satin
With a lustrous, shiny surface, drapability depends on fiber content. Silk and rayon satins have the best stitch results

Silk
A natural filament fiber produced by the silkworm in the construction of its cocoon. Most silk is collected from cultivated worms; Tussah silk, or wild silk, is a thicker, shorter fiber produced by worms in their natural habitat. All silk comes from Asia, primarily China.

Ticking
A variety of fabrics are known as "ticking." The main weave is a closely-woven, thick yarn twill. Spaced, colored, and natural or white yarns repeated in the warp, and all natural or white in the filling, forming a stripe. Several color combinations used, as blue and white, brown and white, red and white. Heavy warp-face sateens as well as heavy sheetings are printed and sold as ticking. Jacquard damask ticking woven in damask effects also sold for this purpose as well as other fabrics, such as drills.

Toile
A type of decorating pattern consisting of a white or off-white background on which a repeated pattern depicting a fairly complex scene, generally of a pastoral theme or other story-type scene. The pattern portion consists of a single colour, most often black, dark red, or blue. Multi-colour toile patterns are less common but not unheard of.

Twill
A fabric that shows a distinct diagonal wale on the face (e.g., denim, gabardine, tricotine).

Voile
A crisp, lightweight, plain weave cotton-like fabric, similar in appearance to organdy and organza. It is appropriate for curtains as well as blouses and dresses.

Woven Fabric
Fabrics composed of two sets of yarns. One set of yarns, the warp, runs along the length of the fabric. The other set of yarns, the fill or weft, is perpendicular to the warp. Woven fabrics are held together by weaving the warp and the fill yarns over and under each other

Yarn
A continuous strand of textile fibers created when a cluster of individual fibers are twisted together. These long yarns are used to create fabrics, either by knitting or weaving.


 i While every effort is made to represent color accurately, every monitor is different and we cannot guarantee the colors you see match the colors of actual fabric.

 © Studio Collection 2012